Brittany Simon

When In Doubt, Choose Adventure!
Recent Tweets @TheAlienHuman
Posts I Love
Asker Anonymous Asks:
not a question but more of a suggestion, have you thought of adding a FAQ
brittanysimon brittanysimon Said:

Interesting :)
What kind of questions would I include?
I’m not sure people are that curious about me.

lipstick-feminists:

nezua:

zuky:

zuky:

(via so-treu)(via zenlavie)
This is Anna May Wong, whom I wrote about on my old blog. Unfortunately the video clip is gone because, ahem, my YouTube account was deleted for repeated terms of use violations (hey I said I was a renegade), but here’s the text:

Anna May Wong catapulted to international fame in 1924, at the age of 19, when she appeared in the Hollywood megaproduction The Thief of Baghdad in a scandalously skimpy exotic costume with Douglas Fairbanks menacingly poking a sword at her bare back. She called herself “the woman of a thousand deaths” because her onscreen characters — prostitutes, dragon ladies, jilted lovers — inevitably died. These were the kinds of concessions to racism, misogyny, and colonialism which Wong had to make in order to flourish in Hollywood; so she made them, and she certainly flourished.
Her story is (fairly) well-known, but Bill Moyers does as good a job retelling it as I’ve seen, in this fifth part of our series. Wong occupied an in-between cultural-historical space whose internal tensions could not possibly be reconciled. Whites were happy to view Wong as a mesmerizing symbol of the Orient (Eric Maschwitz wrote the pop standard "These Foolish Things" about her), while Chinese folks were often torn about what she represented: some lauded her groundbreaking success, others decried the racist depictions she appeared to serve. She never married; her chances at finding a (Chinese American) match in her high-flying showbiz world were nil; she had flings with (white) producers and leading men, but obviously none could last. Wong’s life is often viewed through the lens of tragedy; yet perhaps this is yet another slight against a woman who forcefully, fearlessly pushed her way into the top tier of American glamour and used not only her body but her mind and her voice to shine an unprecedented light on the Chinese American experience.

lipstick-feminists:

nezua:

zuky:

zuky:

(via so-treu)(via zenlavie)

This is Anna May Wong, whom I wrote about on my old blog. Unfortunately the video clip is gone because, ahem, my YouTube account was deleted for repeated terms of use violations (hey I said I was a renegade), but here’s the text:

Anna May Wong catapulted to international fame in 1924, at the age of 19, when she appeared in the Hollywood megaproduction The Thief of Baghdad in a scandalously skimpy exotic costume with Douglas Fairbanks menacingly poking a sword at her bare back. She called herself “the woman of a thousand deaths” because her onscreen characters — prostitutes, dragon ladies, jilted lovers — inevitably died. These were the kinds of concessions to racism, misogyny, and colonialism which Wong had to make in order to flourish in Hollywood; so she made them, and she certainly flourished.

Her story is (fairly) well-known, but Bill Moyers does as good a job retelling it as I’ve seen, in this fifth part of our series. Wong occupied an in-between cultural-historical space whose internal tensions could not possibly be reconciled. Whites were happy to view Wong as a mesmerizing symbol of the Orient (Eric Maschwitz wrote the pop standard "These Foolish Things" about her), while Chinese folks were often torn about what she represented: some lauded her groundbreaking success, others decried the racist depictions she appeared to serve. She never married; her chances at finding a (Chinese American) match in her high-flying showbiz world were nil; she had flings with (white) producers and leading men, but obviously none could last. Wong’s life is often viewed through the lens of tragedy; yet perhaps this is yet another slight against a woman who forcefully, fearlessly pushed her way into the top tier of American glamour and used not only her body but her mind and her voice to shine an unprecedented light on the Chinese American experience.

brittanysimon:

Hello Everyone!

My Etsy shop is updated. I’ve added One Of A Kind Scarves, modeled by my brother Mark. 

They’re all handmade by me, Brittany Simon, and ready to ship within 3 business days!

Check out the shop! And remember, every penny goes to helping Mark become emancipated and continues to help support our lives in Seattle!

As a special ‘Thank You’ I’m also giving Tumblr goers a coupon.

Coupon Code: TumblrLover

Spend $100.00 and get $25.00 off! (For all of you out of the U.S. that’s free shipping!)

Thank you all!

Have a beautiful day!

CLICK HERE TO SHOP!

https://www.etsy.com/shop/ColorsOfAdventure

fawnvelveteen:

Clara Bow, 1927.

fawnvelveteen:

Clara Bow, 1927.

I am not superwoman. My mother is not superwoman. My mother’s mother is not superwoman. I am, we are, soft. Can shatter. Crumble in your hands. Our survival does not mean we prosper. We are like other women but unlike them. So do not tell us we can handle anything. We only seem like superwoman, a figment of your imagination, because you have forced our lives to be perpetual labor with only seconds of relief. If we carry the world on our shoulders and the children on our backs, what are we but your glorified mules slapped with guilt praises of perseverance and strength. Our bones and our blood and our sweat have built the wealth of nations. Our burial should not be the first time we rest.
Yasmin Mohamed Yonis (via ethiopienne)

(via lipstick-feminists)

cutfromadiffcloth:

Brand: Ajepomaa Design Gallery

Designer: Ajepomaa Mensah

Zoti 2014 Collection

cutfromadiffcloth.tumblr.com

(via atane)

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I completely agree with your last point on feminism and bdsm. Sometimes I feel like I am looked at as less of a feminist from peers because I happen to enjoy bdsm, it is quite upsetting to me that that's the case.
brittanysimon brittanysimon Said:

I understand that. I think it’s hard for people who have lived through abuse, who have seen abuse happen and to think that anyone would want to be hurt by their lover.

They see pain as something that’s always bad.

That’s why we need to learn what real consent is. Consent isn’t made out of fear or misunderstanding. It’s made out of a clear understanding.

Have a great day!

brittanysimon:

Hello Everyone!

My Etsy shop is updated. I’ve added One Of A Kind Scarves, modeled by my brother Mark. 

They’re all handmade by me, Brittany Simon, and ready to ship within 3 business days!

Check out the shop! And remember, every penny goes to helping Mark become emancipated and continues to help support our lives in Seattle!

As a special ‘Thank You’ I’m also giving Tumblr goers a coupon.

Coupon Code: TumblrLover

Spend $100.00 and get $25.00 off! (For all of you out of the U.S. that’s free shipping!)

Thank you all!

Have a beautiful day!

CLICK HERE TO SHOP!

https://www.etsy.com/shop/ColorsOfAdventure

Asker Anonymous Asks:
How prevalent do you think misandry, negativity toward consensual sexuality like BDSM or porn, and opposition to freedom of speech ("hate speech") really are in the feminist movement? I think these factors are the primary reason why most gender egalitarians such as myself who embrace the core of the ideology, have nonetheless rejected the movement.
brittanysimon brittanysimon Said:

In tons of way, those who started the movement still aren’t all that progressive, those are just the people we see in the media.

The issue is that I know people in the BDSM community who were there in the sixties, fighting for the rights of women.

The movement isn’t perfect but what it stands for IS.

Feminism is, if going by it’s definition, a great thing to fight for and a great thing to be.

But to assume that all feminists are the same is unrealistic. To assume all people will understand the BDSM community when they’re not meeting people, but only seeing GIF sets and Tumblr photos, is unrealistic.

I’ve dated someone in the community. I dipped my toe in. I understand the context of the images that show up on my dash, but do others?

Do others understand what it means to be a daddy-dom? Do they understand that some people like to come out black and blue after sex?

Do they understand that the community is all about rules, consent and honesty? And do they understand that even within a community that is about rules, consent and honesty it still has people who abuse others?

No movement is perfect, but it’s all worth nothing if we don’t continue to fight to make things that are needed, continue forward.

Does that make sense?

Asker Anonymous Asks:
What do you feel about the feminists that are agaisnt trans men (woman to man transformation)? Personally, I think they´re completely despicable; calling them traitors and whatnot. I mean, JFC, a person doesn´t decide to be trans! Sometimes people are just born with the different gender they truly are. And the feminists that don´t understand that trans men don´t choose to be men is just... Like, did you hit your head when you were a baby? Is that why you´re so fucking stupid??
brittanysimon brittanysimon Said:

You can call yourself a feminist but to be a feminist you have to talk the talk and walk the walk.

Feminism isn’t about hating men. Just because some women call themselves feminists and hate men, doesn’t mean the movement does. It means THOSE people do. They have the right to hate but that does not give them the right to dictate who the movement welcomes.

Hate is sometimes valid but not when it covers ALL men, ALL Women, ALL religious, ALL anything.

Make sense?

myrtlewilson:

feminists who do not support trans women are not feminists. there literally is no way to argue this. if you do not support all women then you are not a feminist i don’t know how much clearer that can be.

Feminist are different. Meaning, not all feminists look the same or have the same backgrounds. To be a feminist, you must walk the walk and talk the talk. Welcoming all women, and offering them choices is key to being a feminist.

(via withlibertyforsome)

heynikashi:

crystalzelda:

johnfreakingegbert:

aztecpriincess:

theskiesabovelife:

Why Tumblr should Fall In Love with Frida Kahlo.

YES OMFG
YES

i love everything about this because i love frida kahlo, but how are you going to not list the fact she was in a horrible bus accident that basically crippled her for most of her life and while lying bedridden she began to paint. frida kahlo didn’t give up and that makes her truly amazing.

Also her bus accident made her unable to have children (she became pregnant three times and had to terminate them due to her condition) which was a huge source of pain for her and many of her paintings depict the enormous physical, emotional and mental suffering she was in (see: columna rota). She was badass but also had a lot of struggle in her life, which was a huge part of who she was and how she viewed the world.

to say she couldnt care less about what people thought of her is an understatement. even though people thought her natural unibrow and moustache were ugly, she embraced them and even darkened them with makeup. honestly the greatest woman.

I’ve been in love with Frida for years. I have her pictures in my house. Reading her bio changed my life. It gave me insight into so much. Frida was Strength.

(via withlibertyforsome)